NYC Releases Fact Sheet on Salary Transparency Requirements in Job, Transfer and Promotion Advertisements – While the City Council Debates Delaying Enactment of the New Law

Employers face new challenges in navigating state and local pay equity laws. New York City joins a number of other jurisdictions that now require employers to disclose pay ranges when advertising job postings – including for incumbents as well as new hires. This law is set to take effect on May 15, 2022 (unless delayed by pending legislation discussed below). The New York City Commission on Human Rights (the “NYCCHR”) recently published a fact sheet providing guidance with regard to Local Law 32 of 2022 (the “NYC Law”). The NYC Law requires all covered employers to include a minimum and a maximum salary in any advertisement for a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity.

Continue reading “NYC Releases Fact Sheet on Salary Transparency Requirements in Job, Transfer and Promotion Advertisements – While the City Council Debates Delaying Enactment of the New Law”

Living With COVID-19: What Is Changing in England and What Does It Mean for Employers?

On 21 February 2022, the U.K. government announced its “Living with COVID-19’” plan. This month’s U.K. Employment Law Update outlines the key changes in England and what it means for employers.

Continue reading “Living With COVID-19: What Is Changing in England and What Does It Mean for Employers?”

Statement of Changes March 2022 – A Corporate Immigration Perspective

The UK government released a “Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules” on March 15, 2022. The government believes these changes to be an important part of their post-COVID “Plan for Growth.” The changes are also being implemented with the intention of simplifying the UK immigration system. Further simplified rules will be published later this year, with the government intending to consolidate the Immigration Rules in 2023. The changes will take effect on various dates starting on April 6, 2022.

For the full alert, visit the Faegre Drinker website.

Philadelphia Enacts New COVID-19 Sick Leave Law

In the midst of changing mask requirements and many people believing that the pandemic is now “over,” the City of Philadelphia has enacted a new COVID-19 sick leave law. On March 9, 2022, Mayor Kenney signed into law an amended version of the 2021 Public Health Emergency Leave Ordinance (the “Ordinance”) requiring covered employers to provide paid sick leave for employees who test positive for COVID-19. This law will stay in effect until December 31, 2023.

Continue reading “Philadelphia Enacts New COVID-19 Sick Leave Law”

New EEOC Technical Assistance Addresses Caregiver Discrimination

On March 14, 2022, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released a technical assistance document, the COVID-19 Pandemic and Caregiver Discrimination Under Federal Employment Discrimination Laws, which explains how discrimination against applicants and employees with caregiving responsibilities can violate federal equal employment opportunity (EEO) laws. Although EEO laws do not prohibit discrimination against caregivers specifically, there are some circumstances in which discrimination against caregivers may be unlawful. Because the COVID-19 pandemic has created — and exacerbated — competing job and caregiving demands for individuals as they navigate hybrid work schedules, unexpected closures of school and care facilities, and potential COVID-19 exposure, the EEOC’s updated information may inform employer decisions and actions as they adapt their workplaces to the evolving COVID-19 pandemic.

Continue reading “New EEOC Technical Assistance Addresses Caregiver Discrimination”

Employers Adjust as COVID-19 Restrictions and Regulations Are Rolled Back Globally

On February 21, Britain’s Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, announced that all of England’s COVID-19 regulations and restrictions would be revoked in coming weeks. Shortly thereafter, countries across the globe began to follow suit.