The Fate of Non-Compete Agreements in New Jersey Remains Unknown

New Jersey may become the latest state to join the growing trend of states enacting legislation to limit the use of common restrictive covenants, such as non-compete and non-solicitation agreements. In May of 2022, Assembly Bill 3715 (“A3715”) was introduced in the New Jersey legislature which, if passed, would significantly impact employers’ ability to enforce non-compete agreements and impose significant obligations aimed at deterring employers from entering into such agreements.

Continue reading “The Fate of Non-Compete Agreements in New Jersey Remains Unknown”

How to Become a Scale-Up Worker Sponsor

The U.K. government has launched a new immigration route, the Scale-Up Worker visa. The route will allow the employer access to a cost- and time-effective means of hiring highly skilled foreign nationals, without necessarily committing to a long-term contract, and it will allow the employee the freedom to change employers without risking their immigration status in the U.K. This article will provide a brief explanation of how an organisation can become eligible to sponsor individuals/employees through this route.

Continue reading “How to Become a Scale-Up Worker Sponsor”

Statement of Changes, October 18, 2022 – Points of Interest

 The Home Office released its most recent “Statement of Changes” on 18 October 2022. Whilst there are no major, over-arching changes being introduced, as we have seen in previous versions of the statement, there are still a number of announcements that will be of interest and significance to those individuals it applies to.

Continue reading “Statement of Changes, October 18, 2022 – Points of Interest”

NLRB General Counsel Encourages Increased Scrutiny of Electronic Employee Monitoring

On October 31, 2022, the General Counsel for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), Jennifer Abruzzo, issued a memorandum instructing regional offices to closely scrutinize employer use of certain electronic monitoring, data collection and automated management technologies. This memorandum further evidences the NLRB’s commitment to effectuating a strong national labor policy which includes protecting employees’ organizational rights and encouraging collective bargaining as described in our November 2020 client alert. Abruzzo reiterated these policy objectives in her February 2022 memorandum issued in support of the Biden administration’s Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment’s February 2022 labor report.

Continue reading “NLRB General Counsel Encourages Increased Scrutiny of Electronic Employee Monitoring”

New Proposed Rule on Independent Contractors: DOL’s Latest Plan for Overhaul of the Existing Standard

On October 11, 2022, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a new proposed rule that is more aligned with judicial precedent than a previous proposal regarding whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The proposed rule would rescind the Independent Contractor Rule (2021 IC Rule) promulgated by the Trump administration on January 5, 2021, which has been criticized by some for making it easier for businesses to classify workers as independent contractors.

This is the DOL’s second attempt to rescind the 2021 IC Rule, after a Texas federal court ruled that the DOL’s first revision failed on procedural grounds. The DOL’s latest proposal may also face legal challenges when it is made final. The proposal is subject to a 45-day comment period beginning October 13, 2022, the date of publication in the Federal Register.

Continue reading “New Proposed Rule on Independent Contractors: DOL’s Latest Plan for Overhaul of the Existing Standard”

New California Laws for 2023 and Beyond: What Employers Should Know

In 2022, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed many laws impacting California employers. Some of the new laws became effective immediately and others, including some that were signed into law just weeks ago, take effect January 1, 2023, or later. These new laws address several topics, including supplemental paid sick leave, pay transparency, leaves of absence and fast-food restaurant employment standards.

As a reminder, the minimum wage in California is increasing to $15.50 per hour on January 1, 2023, for all employers — regardless of the number of workers employed by an employer. Also, many cities and local governments in California have enacted minimum wage ordinances exceeding the state minimum wage.

Continue reading “New California Laws for 2023 and Beyond: What Employers Should Know”