Bostock Six Months Later and Open Questions About Title VII’s Religious Organization Exception

Starkey v. Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis has been appealed. We expect the Seventh Circuit will soon have the opportunity, post-Bostock, to weigh in on the intersection of Title VII’s sexual orientation and gender identity protections and its religious organization exception, related to a religious organization’s employment decisions. This could foreshadow future disputes and court rulings in this developing area of the law.

For the full alert, visit the Faegre Drinker website.

UK Government Extends Furlough Scheme

As England experiences a second lockdown, the UK Government has announced an extension of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (also known as the furlough scheme) to protect businesses and employees as the pandemic continues to adversely impact the economy. Additionally, new regulations have come into force in England which oblige employers to ensure their employees are complying with any requirement to self-isolate.

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Pennsylvania and Philadelphia Introduce New Restrictions in Response to Rising COVID-19 Infections

Pennsylvania

On November 17, 2020, Pennsylvania Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine issued two new orders in response to rising levels of COVID-19 in the Commonwealth. These orders (1) place certain restrictions on individuals traveling into Pennsylvania, and (2) provide increased and more detailed requirements related to the use of face coverings in the Commonwealth.

The travel order requires that all travelers entering Pennsylvania from other countries and states, whether a returning resident or a visitor, must have a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours prior to entering the Commonwealth. If the traveler cannot obtain a negative COVID-19 test, he or she must quarantine for 14 days upon his or her arrival in Pennsylvania or until he or she obtains a negative COVID-19 test result, whichever is earlier. The travel order takes effect on November 20, 2020. Importantly, this order does not apply to individuals who are travelling to or from Pennsylvania for work or medical reasons.

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Colorado Passes Paid Family and Medical Leave Law

Starting on January 1, 2024, Colorado employees will be entitled to take 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave as a result of the passage of Colorado Proposition 118, the Paid Medical and Family Leave Initiative. Employees will be able to take an additional four weeks of paid leave in connection with pregnancy or childbirth complications. The paid leave will be funded through a payroll tax shared equally by employers and employees, starting on January 1, 2023.

For the full alert, visit the Faegre Drinker website.

DOL Finalizes Rule Requiring Internal Approval of Evidence Prior to Issuing Preliminary Notices of Discriminatory Bias Claims Against Contractors

Contractors have more clarity on the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) investigation into discriminatory bias claims, as a final rule is published outlining consistent parameters and approval protocol for evidence. These new developments should equip contractors with additional information prior to the agency issuing a Notice of Violation, allowing contractors an opportunity to refute any initial determination made by the OFCCP or seek prompt resolution.

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Civil Rights Organizations File Lawsuit Seeking to Halt President Trump’s Executive Order Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping

The controversy surrounding President Trump’s “Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping” continues to snowball. After the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and 150-plus business organizations sent a letter to the president contesting the Order and requesting that it be withdrawn, NAACP attorneys took contractor objections a step further, launching a class action lawsuit on behalf of the National Urban League, the National Fair Housing Alliance and others similarly situated. Filed on October 29, 2020, the suit called the Order “an extraordinary and unprecedented act by the Trump Administration to undermine efforts to foster diversity and inclusion in the workplace” and further challenged the federal directive on constitutional grounds.

For the full alert, visit the Faegre Drinker website.