Part II of “The Restricting Covenant” Series: Barbers and Beauty Shops

This is the second article in a continuing series, “The Restricting Covenant.” In this article, I discuss a topic that is near and dear to me – my hair and my long-time relationship with my barber.  I have used the same barber to cut my hair since high school, even after moving many miles away.  I sit in his chair, he cuts my hair with expert precision, and I am a satisfied customer.  This got me to think about one of the most basic reasons why employers want to impose non-compete and non-solicitation obligations on their employees – the value and strength of a long-term customer relationship.  Courts have long recognized that protecting customer relationships is a legitimate protectable business interest that can support the enforcement of a restrictive covenant if it satisfies standards of “reasonableness.”  So if my barber was to leave his current location, could his employer enforce a post-employment covenant that would prohibit him from cutting my hair?  Yikes!

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Part I of “The Restricting Covenant” Series: Psychologists and Psychiatrists

Restrictive covenants are private agreements that restrict an individual’s business activities within a specific geographic area for a period of time, in return for wages, access to information, or some other type of tangible benefit. Like the spots of a leopard, they come in all shapes and sizes.  Their enforceability varies from state to state, from occupation to occupation, and from industry to industry.  Many states have quirky or arcane rules or regulations tailored to specific occupations.  Some industries have specific rules and practices that dictate the parties’ course of dealing and determine the “reasonableness” of the restrictions.  Some employers prefer non-competes, while others prefer non-solicitations or non-disclosures, or some combination of each.  In any event, before agreeing to be restricted, or before asking someone to be restricted, this legal landscape should be explored and understood because litigation in this area of the law can be financially and emotionally draining.  This article discusses restrictive covenants and psychologists and psychiatrists.[1]

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