Mark Terman Interview on BYOD Policies Picked Up by TV Stations Around the Country

Posted on May 30th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Mark Terman Interview on BYOD Policies Picked Up by TV Stations Around the Country

Mark Terman, Labor & Employment partner in the Los Angeles office, was recently interviewed for a story on Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies for employers.  As more and more employees use their own personal devices for work purposes BYOD policies are quickly becoming important for employers to have in place.  The story was picked up by news outlets around the country, including in Miami, FL, Seattle, WA, Jacksonville, FL, Toledo, OH, Milwaukee, WI, Spokane, WA and Orlando, FL.  To view the story that was carried by CBS 4 in Miami click here.  To view posts from LaborSphere on BYOD considerations for employers click here.


Passing AB 1897 Means Greater Liability for Employers Who Use Labor Contractors

Posted on May 23rd, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Passing AB 1897 Means Greater Liability for Employers Who Use Labor Contractors

Editor’s Note: The following post by Saba Shatara, Associate in the Los Angeles office, appears in the latest issue of the California HR Newsletter. To sign-up to receive the California HR Newsletter click here.

Passing AB 1897 Means Greater Liability for Employers Who Use Labor Contractors

The Issue:  Today, many employers rely on labor contractors or temporary employment agencies to sustain their operations.  Occasionally, however, labor contractors fail to comply with labor laws and regulations by failing to (1) pay wages; (2) report and/or pay all required contributions and personal income tax withholdings; and (3) secure workers compensation for subcontractors.  In such cases, are employers liable to subcontractors for these types of violations of their labor contractors?

The Solution:  Historically, for the most part, no.  However, California Assembly Bill (“AB”) 1897, a proposed law currently before the Assembly, would impose joint liability on … Read More »


No More No-Gossip Policies?

Posted on May 22nd, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on No More No-Gossip Policies?

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) administrative law judge ruled recently that the “no-gossip” policy of Laurus Technical Institute, a for-profit technical school located in Georgia, broke federal law because it was overly broad, ambiguous and restricted employees from discussing or complaining about any terms and/or conditions of employment, even though nothing in Laurus’s policy directly addressed discussions about wages, hours or other employment terms and conditions.

Kate Gold, partner in the Los Angeles office, recently told Human Resource Executive Online during an interview on the topic of the Laurus decision and no-gossip policies for employers, “Though the NLRB has been focused on other policies that could violate an employee’s right to engage in protected concerted activity — such as social media or confidentiality policies — no-gossip policies can be especially problematic.”

Kate went on to say “I would not include it among … Read More »


President Obama Signs Two Executive Orders to Limit Workplace Discrimination

Posted on May 8th, by Editor in Fair Pay Act Obligations. Comments Off on President Obama Signs Two Executive Orders to Limit Workplace Discrimination

By: Mark E. Terman and Dennis M. Mulgrew, Jr.

On April 8, 2014, at an event commemorating National Equal Pay Day (an annual public awareness event that aims to draw attention to the gender wage gap), President Obama signed two executive orders designed to limit workplace discrimination.  The first prohibits federal contractors from retaliating against workers who discuss their salaries with one another, while the second instructs the Department of Labor to establish new regulations requiring federal contractors to submit summary data on compensation paid to their employees, including breaking down the data by gender and race.

The protections offered by the anti-retaliation Order overlap with many already existing under state and federal law.  For example, the NLRA protects employees’ right to engage in “concerted activities” and thus already prohibits employer discipline against employees who discuss their wages.  Further, some state laws, … Read More »




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