New Jersey Legislature Postpones Vote to Override Pay Equity Veto

Posted on December 21st, by Editor in Fair Pay Act Obligations. Comments Off on New Jersey Legislature Postpones Vote to Override Pay Equity Veto

By Jessica Burt

On Monday, December 19, 2016, the New Jersey State Legislature postponed its vote to override the Governor’s veto of Senate Bill No. 992, also known as the New Jersey Pay Equity Act.  The Act was passed earlier this year by both the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, but vetoed by Governor Christie.

The Act provides that it will be an unlawful employment practice, or unlawful discrimination, for any employer to pay any of its employees at a rate of compensation, including benefits, which is less than the rate paid to employees of the other sex for substantially similar work.  An employer may pay a different rate of compensation only if the employer demonstrates that the differential is made pursuant to a seniority system, a merit system, or the employer demonstrates:

That the differential is based on one or more legitimate, bona … Read More »


Here’s What that New Philadelphia ‘Pay History’ Law Means for Your Business

Posted on December 15th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Fair Pay Act Obligations. Comments Off on Here’s What that New Philadelphia ‘Pay History’ Law Means for Your Business

David Woolf wrote an article for the Philadelphia Business Journal titled, “Here’s what that new Philadelphia ‘pay history’ law means for your business.” Philadelphia will likely become the first city in the nation to ban employers and employment agencies from asking job applicants for their salary history or requiring disclosure of such information. The Philadelphia City Council unanimously approved the bill on December 8; if enacted as expected, the new law will go into effect 120 days after the Mayor signs it. David discusses what this new bill means for local businesses.

Dave notes that the ordinance would also make it unlawful for an employer to base their compensation offer on an applicant’s prior salary unless the applicant knowingly and willingly discloses their salary history to the employer. The new law is meant to lessen the wage gap earnings between white … Read More »


Resolving Split, Second Circuit Denies FLSA-NYLL Liquidated Damages Double Recovery

Posted on December 12th, by Editor in Wage/Hour Class Actions. Comments Off on Resolving Split, Second Circuit Denies FLSA-NYLL Liquidated Damages Double Recovery

By William R. Horwitz

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit resolved a split among the four New York district courts regarding whether a plaintiff can recover cumulative liquidated damages awards under both the Fair Labor Standards Act (federal law) and the New York Labor Law (state law) for the same wage and hour violation.  In Chowdhury v. Hamza Express Food Corp., 2016 WL 7131854 (2d Cir. Dec. 7, 2016), the Court held that a plaintiff cannot receive double recovery.  The decision will have a significant practical impact on wage and hour litigation.

The Facts

In Chowdhury, the plaintiff, a deli worker, filed a lawsuit against his employer for, among other things, allegedly failing to pay him for overtime work in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and the New York Labor Law (“NYLL”).  During the litigation, … Read More »


Recent Scrutiny of Non-Competes

Posted on December 6th, by Editor in Crisis Management. Comments Off on Recent Scrutiny of Non-Competes

Larry Del Rossi published an article for Today’s General Counsel titled, “Recent Scrutiny of Non-Competes.” Larry provides an overview of non-compete agreements (also known as restrictive covenants) and discusses a recent uptick in government activity that may regulate or challenge private businesses’ use and enforcement of non-competes.

Larry says “one major challenge for national companies is that enforcement of non-competes varies from state to state, so that there is no uniform standard.” In May 2016 the White House issued “Non-Compete Agreements: Analysis of the Usage, Potential Issues, and State Responses,” a document intended to identify areas where implementation and enforcement of non-competes may present issues, put forward a set of best practices, and serve as a call to action for state reform.

Larry advises companies to consider whether all employees within the company should have non-competes, evaluate the scope and structure of … Read More »




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