Federal Court Permanently Enjoins DOL’s Persuader Rule

Posted on November 23rd, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Federal Court Permanently Enjoins DOL’s Persuader Rule

By Cheryl D. Orr and Ramon A. Miyar

A federal district court in Texas has issued a permanent injunction blocking implementation of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) controversial “Persuader Rule,” which was promulgated under the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (“LMRDA”).[1]

The LMRDA imposes public reporting obligations on employers and consultants who enter into agreements to persuade or influence employees’ exercise of their collective bargaining rights.  For more than 50 years, the DOL interpreted the LMRDA’s “Advice Exemption” as exempting from the statute’s onerous reporting requirements indirect “persuader activities” by labor relations consultants, including attorneys. The DOL’s Persuader Rule, however, which took effect on April 25, 2016, removed indirect persuader activities from its definition of exempt advice, thus subjecting confidential attorney-client communications and agreements to the LMRDA’s public reporting requirements.

Following the publication of the Persuader Rule on March … Read More »


National Preliminary Injunction Blocks New FLSA Salary Test from Taking Effect on December 1, 2016

Posted on November 23rd, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Wage/Hour Class Actions. Comments Off on National Preliminary Injunction Blocks New FLSA Salary Test from Taking Effect on December 1, 2016

By Mark E. Terman and Gerald T. Hathaway

A federal court issued a national preliminary injunction prohibiting the Department of Labor’s new salary rule for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees from taking effect. The final rule, published on May 23, 2016 would have gone into effect on Dec. 1, 2016. We wrote about this previously and at this time, recommend that employers suspend, but not cancel their implementation plans.

The rule mandated that employees falling under the executive, administrative or professional exemptions must earn at least $913 per week ($47,476 annually), which would more than double the currently existing minimum salary level of $455 per week. In State of Nevada v. U.S. Dep’t of Labor, No. 4:16-cv-731 (E.D. Tex. filed November 22, 2016) District Court Judge Amos L. Mazzant III (appointed by President Obama) ruled that the Department of … Read More »


DOL Issues Final Rule Establishing Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors

Posted on November 22nd, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Fair Pay Act Obligations. Comments Off on DOL Issues Final Rule Establishing Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors

By Alexa E. Miller

On September 29, 2016, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a Final Rule implementing Executive Order 13706, which requires federal contractors and subcontractors performing work on or in connection with certain contracts to provide employees with up to 56 hours (7 days) of paid sick leave per year beginning on January 1, 2017. However, because this rule became final relatively recently, the Final Rule implementing EO 13706 could be rescinded by exercise of the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. §§ 801-808), which is not subject to filibuster.

Applicability of the Final Rule

The Final Rule applies to certain new contracts and replacement contracts for expiring contracts with the federal government requiring performance in whole or in part within the United States that result from solicitations issued on or after January 1, 2017 (or that are awarded outside the solicitation … Read More »


2016 Presidential Election Aftermath: What Can be Expected in the Labor & Employment Law Space

Posted on November 17th, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence, Counseling & Compliance Training, Crisis Management, Fair Pay Act Obligations, Wage/Hour Class Actions. Comments Off on 2016 Presidential Election Aftermath: What Can be Expected in the Labor & Employment Law Space

By Gerald T. Hathaway

We continue to analyze and assess what the 2016 election results mean in the Labor & Employment Law space, and what we can expect from a GOP White House, House and Senate.  The last two times that this GOP alignment was present were 1929 and 2007 (let’s hope that the financial events that followed those two occasions – the Great Depression and the Great Recession – do not repeat themselves this time around).

It is difficult to predict what President Donald J. Trump’s actual agenda will be, because his campaign was long on broad concepts and very short on serious, detailed policy presentation. While Candidate Trump said many things, including contradictory things, about many topics, some themes can be discerned from pre-election and post-election comments.  Also, some issues have been on the GOP wish list for some time, … Read More »


Ruling Postponed on Whether the DOL Exemption Rules will be Enjoined Before December 1, 2016

Posted on November 16th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Wage/Hour Class Actions. Comments Off on Ruling Postponed on Whether the DOL Exemption Rules will be Enjoined Before December 1, 2016

By Mark E. Terman and Gerald T. Hathaway

Since our November 10 Post, Will the DOL Exemption Rules Be Enjoined Before December 1, 2016?, federal District Court Judge Amos L. Mazzant, III heard nearly 3.5 hours of argument today on the Emergency Motion for Preliminary Injunction to stop nationwide implementation of the Department of Labor’s May 16, 2016 Final Rule Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees.  If not enjoined, this Final Rule will require that, by December 1, 2016, employees be paid a weekly salary of at least $913 (annually, $47,476) to maintain “white collar” exemption from overtime and other federal Fair Labor Standards Act requirements, as long as the employees’ duties satisfy the exemption rules too.

The Court took the matter under advisement, projected that a ruling will be issued Tuesday, November 22, … Read More »


The EEOC’s 2017-2021 Strategic Enforcement Plan – Targeting the “Gig Economy” and Independent Contractor Misclassification

Posted on November 15th, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence, Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on The EEOC’s 2017-2021 Strategic Enforcement Plan – Targeting the “Gig Economy” and Independent Contractor Misclassification

By Gregory W. Homer and Dennis M. Mulgrew

The EEOC has issued its new Strategic Enforcement Plan for the fiscal years 2017 to 2021, which outlines the areas in which the EEOC will focus its litigation and investigation resources in the next four years.  The Plan is notable for its emphasis on the “gig” workforce – that is, the short-term, temporary, or freelance workers (often working for companies like Uber, Lyft, AirBnb, or Taskrabbit) who are typically classified as independent contractors rather than employees.

In the Plan, the EEOC identified the rise of the “gig” economy as an “emerging and developing issue” warranting increased focus, particularly with regard to “clarifying the employment relationship and the application of workplace civil rights protections in light of the increasing complexity of employment relationships and structures, including temporary workers, staffing agencies, independent contractor relationships, and the … Read More »


Careful, Your Website is Showing! Retailers Should Start Preparing for Website Accessibility Class Actions

Posted on November 14th, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence, Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Careful, Your Website is Showing! Retailers Should Start Preparing for Website Accessibility Class Actions

By Kate S. Gold, Michael P. Daly, Bradley J. Andreozzi and Alexis Burgess

Retailers have been the predominant targets of a recent wave of demand letters claiming that their websites and mobile applications unlawfully discriminate against disabled customers. These demands come on the heels of the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) confirmation that, in 2018, it will propose accessibility standards for private businesses, based on the accessibility standards it has already proposed for public entities. Even with two months left in the year, 2016 has already seen more single-plaintiff and class action lawsuits actually filed against retailers on this issue than ever before. In the face of an increasingly active plaintiffs’ bar, any retailer with a commercial website or mobile application—especially those operating in California, New York, or Pennsylvania, where the majority of these suits have been filed—should take notice and prepare … Read More »


Will the DOL Exemption Rules Be Enjoined Before December 1, 2016?

Posted on November 10th, by Editor in Wage/Hour Class Actions. Comments Off on Will the DOL Exemption Rules Be Enjoined Before December 1, 2016?

By Mark Terman and Gerald T. Hathaway

The Department of Labor’s May 16, 2016 Final Rule Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees require that, by  December 1, 2016, employees must be paid a weekly salary of at least $913 (annually, $47,476) to maintain “white collar” exemption from overtime and other federal Fair Labor Standards Act requirements, as long as the employees’ duties satisfy the exemption rules too.  We wrote about this previously.

Last month, twenty-one states, led by Nevada and Texas, filed an emergency motion to enjoin implementation of the Final Rule in a federal court action commenced the month before.  State of Nevada, et al. v. DOL (USDC, Eastern District of Texas, case No., 4:16-cv-00731-ALM).  At its core, the action challenges DOL authority to increase the salary threshold and set automatic increases, and … Read More »


The SEC’s First Risk Alert of Fiscal Year 2017 Targets Registrant Rule 21F-17 Compliance

Posted on November 8th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on The SEC’s First Risk Alert of Fiscal Year 2017 Targets Registrant Rule 21F-17 Compliance

By James G. Lundy, Shavaun Adams Taylor and Matthew M. Morrissey

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC or Commission) Office of Compliance Inspections and Examination (OCIE) issued a Risk Alert on October 24, 2016, titled “Examining Whistleblower Rule Compliance.” This recent Risk Alert continues the SEC’s aggressive efforts to compel Rule 21F-17 compliance and puts the investment management and broker-dealer industries on formal notice that OCIE intends to scrutinize registrants’ compliance with the whistleblower provisions of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd–Frank). By way of background, Dodd–Frank established a whistleblower protection program to encourage individuals to report possible violations of securities laws. Importantly, in addition to providing whistleblowers with financial incentives, Rule 21F-17 provides that no person may take action to impede a whistleblower from communicating directly with the SEC about potential securities law violations, including by … Read More »


Under New OSHA Rules, Employers May Not Conduct Post-Accident Drug Tests Simply as a Matter of Course

Posted on November 4th, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence, Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Under New OSHA Rules, Employers May Not Conduct Post-Accident Drug Tests Simply as a Matter of Course

By Laurie A. Holmes and Matthew A. Fontana

A mandatory drug and alcohol test after a workplace injury seems like a no brainer, right? Most companies believe so, which is why mandatory drug and alcohol testing after workplace injuries has become a common policy.  However, new Occupational Health and Safety Administration (“OSHA”) regulations on electronic reporting of workplace injuries cast doubt on the continued legality of such policies.  Specifically, OSHA’s new position is that mandatory post-injury testing deters the reporting of workplace safety incidents by employees and therefore employers who continue to operate under such policies will face penalties and enforcement scrutiny. In light of OSHA’s enforcement position, it is time for your company to review and revise its mandatory post-accident drug and alcohol testing policy.

Effective August 10, 2016,[1] OSHA’s final rules on electronic reporting of workplace injuries require employers to … Read More »




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