WHO IS A SUPERVISOR UNDER TITLE VII?

Posted on June 26th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Crisis Management. No Comments

By: Jerrold J. Wohlgemuth

In its 1998 opinions in Faragher v. Boca Raton and Burlington Industries v. Ellerth, the Supreme Court held that harassment by a supervisor can result in liability against an employer, but that an employer would only be liable for harassment by a non-supervisory employee if it knew or should have known of the harassment and was negligent in failing to correct it.  It has remained unclear, however, exactly who is a supervisor for purposes of vicarious harassment liability under Title VII.  The First, Seventh and Eighth Circuits have held that an individual is a supervisor for purposes of harassment liability only if he/she has been given the authority to take tangible employment actions  –  to hire, fire, demote, transfer or discipline – against the victim of harassment.  The Second, Fourth and Ninth Circuits have adopted the definition … Read More »


Unpaid Interns Deemed Employees Under the FLSA

Posted on June 14th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. No Comments

By: Kate S. Gold and Elena S. Min

A federal district court in New York ruled last week that unpaid interns who worked on the production of films for Fox Searchlight Pictures Inc. and Fox Entertainment Group, Inc. were actually employees who should have been paid in accordance with the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and New York Labor Law (“NYLL”).  Glatt v. Fox Searchlight Pictures Inc., Case No. 11-CV-06784 (S.D.N.Y. 2013).  This decision comes just weeks after another Southern District of New York judge issued a favorable defense ruling by denying class certification for unpaid interns at various Hearst-owned magazines.  See Wang v. The Hearst Corporation, Case No. 12-CV-00793 (S.D.N.Y. 2013).

In Glatt, the court applied the six-factor test set used by the Department of Labor (“DOL”)  and determined that two unpaid interns who worked on production of Black Swan were … Read More »


NLRB Rules That Policy Requiring Employees to Individually Arbitrate Employment Disputes Violates the National Labor Relations Act

Posted on June 11th, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence. No Comments

By: Gregory W. Homer and Dennis Mulgrew

On June 3, 2013 an National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) reached a decision in which it found that MasTec Services’ Company’s policy that required employees to individually arbitrate employment disputes violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  In so holding, the ALJ radically expanded the NLRB’s previous decision in D. R. Horton, Inc. (1/3/12).  As D.R. Horton itself has been rejected by almost all federal courts which have considered it, the MasTec decision is bound to create a firestorm of criticism.

In D.R. Horton, the NLRB ruled that requiring employees to sign a blanket waiver of rights to pursue their employment claims through class actions violated Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA.  The specific agreement at issue in D.R. Horton (1) contained a mandatory arbitration provision, and (2) required employees to bring … Read More »




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