Yahoo’s Ban on Working from Home: Does it Raise Red Flags For Other Companies?

Posted on February 28th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training, Crisis Management. Comments Off on Yahoo’s Ban on Working from Home: Does it Raise Red Flags For Other Companies?

By: Lynne Anderson

Yahoo’s widely reported decision to require its remote workforce to physically report to one of Yahoo’s office locations – or face termination of employment – has caused a social media stir. Here are some of the common questions, and our thoughts about whether Yahoo’s decision signals a trend applicable to other companies.

Q: Can Yahoo fire its remote workforce if they refuse to return to the office?

A: For the most part – yes.  If employees are employed “at-will,” then they can be fired with or without cause, and without notice. In other words, Yahoo’s statement that they feel the business is best served by the regular, spontaneous interactions resulting from having employees in the office is a legitimate non-discriminatory reason to require employees to return to the offices.  Therefore, any employee who refuses to physically report to a Yahoo … Read More »


Second Circuit Rejects Application of McDonnell Douglas to New York City Human Rights Law – But Grants Summary Judgment Under More Lenient Analysis

Posted on February 21st, by Editor in Audits/Due Diligence, Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Second Circuit Rejects Application of McDonnell Douglas to New York City Human Rights Law – But Grants Summary Judgment Under More Lenient Analysis

By: William R. Horwitz

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently affirmed a district court’s summary judgment dismissal of a lawsuit that an attorney filed against her former employer alleging race discrimination under federal, state and New York City law.  In Simmons v. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP, 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 1571 (2d Cir. 2013), the Court explained that the trial court had erroneously applied the McDonnell Douglas analysis to a New York City Human Rights Law claim, rather than only to the federal and state claims.  Nonetheless, the Second Circuit concluded that the trial court properly dismissed all of the claims.

Plaintiff Tameka Simmons worked as an associate for defendant law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP (“Akin Gump”), from 2007 to late 2009.  In 2009, the firm was … Read More »


Noel Canning: Where do we go from here?

Posted on February 4th, by Editor in Counseling & Compliance Training. Comments Off on Noel Canning: Where do we go from here?

By: Jerrold J. Wohlgemuth

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit determined last week in Noel Canning v. NLRB that the recess appointments of Board Members Flynn, Block and Griffin were unconstitutional because the Senate was not technically in “recess” when they were appointed in January 2012.  That decision does not mean – as some have insisted – that the Board must stop all proceedings until new members are confirmed.  Quite the contrary.

With respect to internal Board proceedings, the decision will have no impact on the work of either the General Counsel’s Office or the Regional Offices in conducting investigations or issuing complaints.  Indeed, we should fully expect the Acting General Counsel to continue to pursue his ambitious and controversial agenda.

As recently made clear by Board Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce, the … Read More »




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